Anacostia Tributary Trail System

D.C. area residents and visitors can preview nearly 63 miles of the Anacostia Tributary Trail System (ATTS) from a computer or hand held device before setting out to hike or bike, thanks to a new interactive digital map that features 360-degree Panoramic views of the system’s trails.

The ATTS is a system of trails located throughout the Anacostia Watershed in the District of Columbia and suburban Maryland. Maintained by Prince George County Department of Parks and Recreation, Montgomery County Department of Parks, and the National Park Service, among others.

The interactive map is a project of the Anacostia Watershed Restoration Partnership (AWRP), a regional effort supported by the District of Columbia, Montgomery and Prince George's Counties, state and federal partners, and led by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments to coordinate the restoration and protection of Anacostia River. Eleven trails are available for digital viewing, including The Anacostia Riverwalk Trail (District of Columbia), Rachel Carson Greenway Trail (Montgomery County) and Indian Creek Trail (Prince George's County).

In addition to the panoramic images, information on the length of each trail, elevation, temperature, and wind speed is also provided. The map also identifies points of interest along each trail, such as Wheaton Regional Park, Bladensburg Waterfront Park, and the U.S.S. Barry. Bike Share docking stations are pinpointed, and trailgoers can also tell when a part of the system is under construction.

"As the National Park Service enters its centennial year, one of our goals is to connect more people with incredible places right in their communities," Superintendent Gopaul Noojibail said. "We're excited to help launch this new, interactive map to inspire more District residents and visitors to find their park in Anacostia Park."

The panoramic images were captured by Terrain360 using cameras mounted on a backpack and bikes. Terrain360 has created virtual tours of other trails, waterways, and landscapes—such as the Shenandoah Valley and the James River. Additional imagery will be added when the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail is complete in October 2016. This will make the ATTS and linking trails one of the largest urban trails systems in the country.